Posts Tagged ‘tenure’

Good article on specialization of CMOs.

Wednesday, May 14th, 2008
What “Flavor” of Marketer Do You Need?
Posted by Steven Lamont on 05/13/08 under Marketing Process & Organizational Design

What Flavor of Marketer does your enterprise need?Many have heard the story about Eskimos having 32 words for snow, given how important it is in their lives. Similarly, technology companies have many different classification for technology workers — from CTO to CIO, and from lead web developer to database architects. Most technology companies have a very clear idea about what these jobs entail and who qualifies for them.

http://www.achievemarketleadership.com/wp-trackback.php?p=245

Bob London is president of London, Ink, a Maryland-based marketing and communications consulting firm, and serves as a Virtual VP of Marketing for growth stage companies that need an injection of marketing experience and leadership to drive key initiatives and results.

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What is a Virtual VP of Marketing and when do companies need one?

Wednesday, February 20th, 2008

Recent reports state that the average tenure of a chief marketing officer (CMO) is now down to 18 – 24 months. Given the risky investment this represents to companies in terms of cost, commitment, resources and lost opportunity, the Virtual VP of Marketing model is becoming much more attractive.

For many growth-stage companies, marketing can be the most challenging function to resource for three main reasons: First, because marketing is hard to define; to some companies it means thought leadership, to others business development and others branding (which, in and of itself is one of least understood, often abused terms in business).

Second, once you define it, marketing success can be difficult to measure; therefore expectations in hiring a CMO may not be articulated in the most effective way. The result is a gap between the CEO and CMO from day one on priorities, objectives and resources.

Third, all to often a CMO expects to have the resources to hire specialized staff and/or an outside agency for lead generation, online marketing, pr, etc. In a growth-stage business, those resources cannot typically be justified. And as importantly, those business must by definition maintain maximum flexibility in the way resources are allocated and committed.

Companies need a Virtual VP of Marketing when they can’t or aren’t ready to justify the cost and commitment of a full-time marketing executive to address its needs, yet:

  • Marketing deliverables and challenges are piling up.
  • Marketing lags behind the company in terms of offerings, reputation, innovation, etc.
  • The company hasn’t kept pace with its marketplace and needs an injection of strategic assessment and planning.
  • New target markets or segments are being considered.
  • Growth has slowed or stalled.
  • Their industry is getting more competitive.
  • Their business is becoming more marketing-dependent or marketing-driven.
  • They need a fresh perspective that incorporates a healthy dose of customer feedback.
  • They are considering an outside marketing/pr agency but don’t have the expertise to properly manage them.

What does a Virtual VP of Marketing do?

  • Helps CEOs and other senior executives assess and define and rank their situation and market opportunities by incorporating input from key constituencies.
  • Works with the executive team to develop and validate business/marketing strategies.
  • Develops the go-to-market strategy and action plan with prioritized, cost justified marketing initiatives.
  • Manages or leads the execution of key marketing programs, from awareness to lead generation to drive customer acquisition and retention.
  • Develops all creative materials (design, copywriting, Web sites) in direct support of marketing objectives.
  • Manages existing staff and vendors to optimize resource mix and output.

Bob London is president of London, Ink, a Maryland-based marketing and communications consulting firm, and serves as a Virtual VP of Marketing for growth stage companies that need an injection of marketing experience and leadership to drive key initiatives and results.

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DANGER: CMOs crossing.

Monday, February 4th, 2008

 

How To Move CMOs Out Of Harm’s Way Feb. 4, 2008 (Investor’s Business Daily): http://money.cnn.com/news/newsfeeds/articles/newstex/IBD-0001-22724238.htm

Warning: If you’re seeking job security, don’t think about becoming a chief marketing officer.

Over the last few months, the CMOs of Home Depot (NYSE:HD) HD, Wendy’s WEN, Rite Aid (OOTC:RADCO) (NYSE:RAD) RAD and Chico’s CHS changed over.

In a study of 100 leading consumer companies in June 2007, executive search firm Spencer Stuart reported that the average tenure of CEOs is 44 months but CMOs last only 26 months. In fact, 40 of 100 CMOs turned over in 2006 and 31 of 100 lost their jobs in 2007, noted Greg Welch, a practice leader in consumer goods at the Chicago-based search firm.

Why are CMOs facing a fast-moving revolving door?

Why most CMOs get fired (David Meerman Scott): http://money.cnn.com/news/newsfeeds/articles/newstex/IBD-0001-22724238.htm

A few weeks ago I get a call from Gary Stern, a columnist for Investors Business Daily.

Gary says, “I’m doing a story on the average tenure of Chief Marketing Officers, which is only 26 months. This is much shorter than 44 months, which is how long CEOs last. Can you comment?”

See the full post at http://www.webinknow.com/2008/02/why-most-cmos-g.html

See a preview of the IBD story at

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